Health

Types of Tea: Weighing Risks and Benefits

In India and among Indians, tea is vital. There is one beverage that almost never gets a ‘no’ when offered. A cup of tea awakens the senses and restores freshness, making it the perfect beverage to take a break with. In the past, tea has undergone a large amount of experimentation, and people have created recipes that have expanded the range of benefits it offers. We will explore five types of tea in this post, as well as their benefits, that people drink enthusiastically every day, whether for specific health reasons or as a regular cup of tea.

Tea, Green

Green tea, considered one of the best types of tea for overall health, has a long list of advantages that are expertly combined in a cup. Green tea, which is high in antioxidants, reduces oxidative stress and lowers the risk of a variety of illnesses, including cancer.

Black Tea

Black tea has a high caffeine content, making it an excellent substitute for black coffee. Black tea has been shown to be particularly effective in the battle against chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart disease. It’s one of the best ways to start your day or recharge in the middle of it.

Tea with Lavender

While black tea provides the energy you need to start your day, lavender tea is the best way to finish it. It has numerous advantages, including those that help you sleep better. It is also thought to be beneficial to your skin’s health.

Tea with Tulsi

A cup of Tulsi tea offers numerous health benefits. One of the most significant is that Tulsi tea helps to strengthen your immunity. It is also anti-inflammatory. Furthermore, Tulsi tea is ideal for those suffering from a cold or sore throat. Tea noir. Also, Read: How Drinking Water Benefits the Skin

Black Tea

Black tea has a high caffeine concentration, making it an excellent substitute for black coffee. Black tea has been shown to be particularly effective in the battle against chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart disease. It’s one of the best ways to start your day or recharge in the middle of it.

Tea with Milk

Last but not least, Milk Tea should be on your list of teas to familiarize your palate and body with. Milk tea, a superb mood stabilizer, works like a charm every time you take a cup of it.

CONSUMPTION OF TEA IN EXCESS:

Drinking tea in moderation is generally regarded as a healthful habit, however, drinking more than three cups a day may come with some undesirable side effects. Let’s take a look at some of the potential ill effects of too much tea.

Iron Absorption is Reduced

Tea contains a high concentration of tannins, a type of chemical. Some foods contain tannins, which bind to iron and prevent it from being absorbed in the digestive tract. Iron deficiency is one of the most frequent nutrient deficits worldwide, and if you have low iron levels, drinking too much tea may aggravate your problem. According to research, tea tannins are more likely to inhibit iron absorption from plant sources than from animal-based diets. As a result, if you maintain a strict vegan or vegetarian diet, you may want to watch how much tea you drink. The amount of tannins in tea varies greatly depending on the variety and method of preparation.

Anxiety, Stress, and Agitation have all Increased

Caffeine is found naturally in tea leaves. Caffeine from tea, or any other source, in excess, may add to sensations of worry, stress, and restlessness. The caffeine content of an average cupย  of tea varies depending on the variety and brewing technique. Black teas contain more caffeine than green and white teas, and the longer you steep your tea, the more caffeine it contains.

Inadequate Sleep

Because tea includes caffeine, excessive consumption may interrupt your sleep cycle. Melatonin is a hormone that alerts your brain when it is time to sleep. According to certain studies, coffee may impede melatonin production, resulting in poor sleep quality. Inadequate sleep has been linked to a number of mental health disorders, including exhaustion, decreased memory, and diminished attention span. Furthermore, persistent sleep deprivation is linked to a higher risk of obesity and poor blood sugar control.

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